disappoint


disappoint
[15] Disappoint (a borrowing from French désappointer) originally meant ‘remove from a post or office, sack’ – that is, literally, ‘deprive of an appointment’; ‘A monarch … hath power … to appoint or to disappoint the greatest officers’, Thomas Bowes, De La Primaudraye’s French academie 1586. This semantic line has now died out, but parallel with it was a sense ‘fail to keep an appointment’, which appears to be the ancestor of modern English ‘fail to satisfy, frustrate, thwart’.

The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins. 2013.

Synonyms: